Gypsy Romance Patchwork Throw

??????????

I came across this Gypsy Romance Patchwork Pom Pom Throw on Sew4Home, one of my favorite sewing sites,  several months ago.  Just a few days ago, I finally finished my interpretation of this project. Not all the fabrics shown were available, so I put together some additional patterns I liked from the Gypsy Bandana collection by Michael Miller. And, as I was unable to find a velvet color I really liked,  I used polar fleece instead.  I’m very pleased with the result, especially since the pattern was quite challenging, even for an experienced sewist.

Of course, as you’ve seen, I have a passion for patchwork–mostly patchwork squares.  This throw was certainly much more complicated! Once I had all four panels done, it was time to sew them together.

Putting panels together
Putting panels together

Fortunately, the directions were easy to follow.  Unfortunately, I cut two of the pieces for Panel 1 an inch too , and had to improvise a solution.

Note three strips of fabric  together in middle of Panel 1, instead of just one strip on 2, 3 and 4
Note three strips of fabric together in middle of Panel 1, instead of just one strip on 2, 3 and 4

Of course, no one but me knows the pattern didn’t call for those three strips of fabric on the left!  I also added a feather stitch between the panels, because I believe small details are important.  (Actually, I’m more than a little neurotic about those things. My friends love me anyway.)

Featherstitching between panels
Featherstitching between panels

Since I didn’t like how the batting seemed to pull away from the two fabric layers, I stitched in the ditch between panels to hold it together.

Stitching in the ditch to anchor batting underneath
Stitching in the ditch to anchor batting underneath

Sew4Home gives just about the best explanation of fussy cutting I’ve ever read:  “You fussy cut when you select and cut out a specific motif on printed fabric. For example, a quilt where you cut each square to showcase a specific element of a fabric’s overall pattern.”  And their tutorial on the technique of fussy cutting is excellent.

Cutting strips from the Aqua Gypsy Road fabric wasn’t easy (cutting isn’t my strong suit).  The rotary cutter was my best friend here. I would be remiss, however, if I didn’t say how essential the Big Board was, too, especially for cutting the long panel pieces.

My Big Board
My Big Board

My throw took weeks to finish. Having to use the floor for layout was especially annoying. Still, there just wasn’t any other way.  I love my Soon, I’ll put together some matching pillows with the remaining fabric.  For now, completing this very complicated design is enough.

Ready for its close up
Ready for its close up
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s